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Texas WR Daje Johnson apologized to Charlie Strong for "Dealer" rap single

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The Longhorns speedster won't face another suspension, but strength and conditioning coach Pat Moorer probably isn't his favorite person right now.

Tim Heitman-USA TODAY Sports

When Texas Longhorns senior wide receiver Daje Johnson stirred up controversy by releasing a rap single called "Dealer", he seemed certain to draw the attention of head coach Charlie Strong, who counts "No Drugs" among his five core values.

So what happened when Strong did hear about Johnson's single, most likely from strength and conditioning coach Pat Moorer, who has an app that monitors each player's social media accounts? Strong explained on Tuesday at Big 12 Media Days:

So it seems that Johnson won't miss any games as a result of the incident, nor should he, but Strong and Moorer will likely continue to keep a close eye on the oft-suspended speedster who Strong said had "come a million miles" during the spring before jokingly knocking on wood. Since the superstitious gesture didn't end up working, Johnson may face some additional conditioning work from Moorer as a result of the less-than-ideal decision to write and release the song.

Johnson's no stranger to such punishment -- after fumbling twice during the Orange-White game, once on a fair catch, he had to stay on the field after the scrimmage to go through extra conditioning.

However, despite the incident, Johnson was the first player singled out by Strong when asked about the wide receivers he wants to see emerge this season.

"You look at Daje, he's a senior now, Marcus Johnson, those guys need to step up and become playmakers," said Strong. "I was just teasing Daje the other day, and I said, 'You haven't made a play since Oklahoma when you returned that punt for a touchdown.'

"There's got to be a point where he's got to step up and start at that position. Because you're always looking for playmakers, and then that takes a lot of pressure off the quarterback because, if you can throw the ball out there and make a guy miss in open field and you can take it the distance, then you always give yourself confidence and also give the offense confidence."