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3-star OL Connor Robertson signs with Texas

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The Austin Westlake product is following a pipeline to the Forty Acres and staying close to home.

Connor Robertson
247Sports

Three-star offensive tackle Connor Robertson, a native of Westlake High School in Austin, has decided to stick close to home for his college career. He signed with the Texas Longhorns on Wednesday during.

Robertson committed to Texas in July after considering offers from the likes of Northwestern and Stanford. He held 31 total offers.

At 6’4, 296 pounds, Robertson is the No. 27 interior offensive lineman nationally and the No. 82 player overall in Texas, according to the 247Sports Composite rankings. Robertson’s signing helps solidify a fix to the Texas needs on the the offensive line. Joining him are the likes of five-star offensive lineman Kelvin Banks out of Humble Summer Creek, who flipped from the Oregon Ducks last week after head coach Mario Cristobol announced he was leaving to take the job with the Miami Hurricanes.

BON’s Daniel Seahorn offered this analysis of Robertson earlier this year: Connor Robertson is my kind of football player. He is the kind of player that will have the offensive line coach grinning and giggling as they sift through game tape. Robertson logs snaps at tackle on tape for Westlake, but his physical measurables are going to kick him inside long term at the collegiate level. Robertson showed me a little bit of everything on tape and was encouraging to see for his long-term outlook. He comes off the ball with a low hat and a bad attitude and shows his aggressive nature early and often on his film. No matter what you ask him to do, he is bringing his hard hat and lunch pail to the fight and looking for some work and it warms the cockles of my old offensive lineman heart. The first clip of his junior tape shows him absolutely obliterating a poor defender on a pull and that set the tone for the rest of the watch. Robertson possesses a nasty disposition on the football field and consistently shows good play strength and power and his hands. Whether he is manned up in a solo block or collaborating in a combination block, Robertson shows he can displace his man from the LOS and is often dumping them to the turf for good measure. Robertson does not face the stiffest of competition in pass protection, but I like that he shows good patience and footwork against the speed rushes, and he shows the ability to ‘sit down’ on power rushes and does not allow himself to be thrown off balance. The latter is going to come into play a lot at the next level once he moves closer to the ball on the interior and the defenders get heavier and wider. I will always say this when it comes to evaluating offensive line prospects. If you find yourself battling with schools like Stanford and Northwestern for a kid, then you are probably doing something right because those programs do a hell of a job evaluating and developing the position. On top of that it means the kid is smart and that obviously bolsters his ceiling even more as a player. I like Robertson a good bit and he has been one of the more fun watches for me to date. I think he is a high floor prospect with a chance to be a guy that logs a lot of starts at the next level if he continues to develop at a good clip.